Posted on : September 10, 2017
Views : 16
Category : Strategy
Porter’s five forces analysis is a framework for analyzing the level of competition within an industry and business strategy development. It draws upon industrial organization (IO) economics to derive five forces that determine the competitive intensity and therefore the attractiveness of an industry. Attractiveness in this context refers to the overall industry profitability. An “unattractive” industry is one in which the combination of these five forces acts to drive down overall profitability. A very unattractive industry would be one approaching “pure competition”, in which available profits for all firms are driven to normal profit.
  1. Threat of New Entrants
  2. Threat of Substitutes
  3. Bargaining Power of Customers
  4. Bargaining Power of Suppliers
  5. Industry Rivalry
Porter refers to these forces as the micro environment, to contrast it with the more general term macro environment. They consist of those forces close to a company that affect its ability to serve its customers and make a profit. A change in any of the forces normally requires a business unit to re-assess the marketplace given the overall change in industry information. The overall industry attractiveness does not imply that every firm in the industry will return the same profitability. Firms are able to apply their core competencies, business model or network to achieve a profit above the industry average. A clear example of this is the airline industry. As an industry, profitability is low and yet individual companies, by applying unique business models, have been able to make a return in excess of the industry average.
  • Porter’s five forces include three forces from ‘horizontal’ competition: the threat of substitute products or services, the threat of established rivals, and the threat of new entrants; and two forces from ‘vertical’ competition: the bargaining power of suppliers and the bargaining power of customers.
source: Michael E. Porter. “The Five Competitive Forces that Shape Strategy”, Harvard Business Review, January 2008 (Vol. 88, No. 1), pp. 78-93 wikipedia.org